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Endstation Venedig

Death in a Strange Country

Commissario Brunetti's 2nd Case
Published by Diogenes as Endstation Venedig
Original Title: Death in a Strange Country. Commissario Brunetti's 2nd Case

Early one morning Guido Brunetti, Commissario of the Venice Police, confronts a grisly sight when the body of a young man is fished out of a fetid Venetian canal. All the clues point to a violent mugging, but for Brunetti the robbery motive seems altogether too convenient. Then something very incriminating is discovered in the dead man's flat, something which points to the existence of a high level cabal - and Brunetti becomes convinced that somebody, somewhere, is taking great pains to provide a ready-made solution to the crime.


Crime fiction, General Fiction
400 pages
1995

978-3-257-06051-5

World rights are handled by Diogenes

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»Brunetti ... long ago joined the ranks of the classic fictional detectives.«
Evening Standard, London
»Slips along like a motorised gondola.«
Oxford Times
»Commissario Brunetti, most charismatic current Euro-cop, uncovers deadly ants' nest of corruption. Highly accomplished, scary read.«
Guardian
»Brunetti ... is the most humane sleuth since Georges Simenon's Inspector Maigret ... He is a decent man [who achieves] a quiet heroism.«
The Philadelphia Inquirer
»Leon's books shimmer in the grace of their setting and are warmed by the charm of their characters.«
The New York Times Book Review
»Brunetti ... long ago joined the ranks of the classic fictional detectives.«
Evening Standard, London
»Slips along like a motorised gondola.«
Oxford Times
»Commissario Brunetti, most charismatic current Euro-cop, uncovers deadly ants' nest of corruption. Highly accomplished, scary read.«
Guardian
»Brunetti ... is the most humane sleuth since Georges Simenon's Inspector Maigret ... He is a decent man [who achieves] a quiet heroism.«
The Philadelphia Inquirer
»Leon's books shimmer in the grace of their setting and are warmed by the charm of their characters.«
The New York Times Book Review
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