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Der Sänger

The Singer

Published by Diogenes as Der Sänger
Original Title: Der Sänger

From global star to refugee – the incredible story of Joseph Schmidt, one of the most beautiful voices of the 20th century.

His voice filled concert halls, beguiled women, captured an audience of millions in Germany, Europe, and America, where they called him »the small man with the great voice«.
Joseph Schmidt, the son of orthodox Jews from Czernowitz, Ukraine, made an incredible success of himself. What a journey from an unknown Eastern European Shtetl to the famous Carnegie Hall! In 1942, however, fame and talent are worth nothing.
On the run from the Nazis, the famous tenor becomes ill and is just one of thousands of exhausted refugees stuck at the Swiss border. Will he make it to the other side, to safety?


General Fiction
288 pages
2019

978-3-257-07052-1

World rights are handled by Diogenes

Film rights are handled by Diogenes

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»[With his language] Hartmann succeeds in striking a soft chord, and he also manages to describe the horror [of war camps].«

 

Christian Berzins / Tages-Anzeiger, Zurich

»A masterful balancing act.«

Elmar Krekeler / Die Welt, Berlin

»The Swiss author, who repeatedly shows in his novels that the present cannot exist without the past, lambastes his homeland for self-righteously extolling itself as a bastion of democracy throughout history.«

Lilo Solcher / Augsburger Allgemeine

»[. . .] the book’s real strength lies in its unspoken topicality, this recurring conflict between humanity and a rationally comprehensible yet often cruel political pragmatism.«

Jutta Duhm-Heitzmann / WDR 3, Cologne

»Through these characters, Hartmann asks questions of history, of the Switzerland from that time, and of his readers too. He doesn’t answer them. And that’s exactly as it should be.«

Susanne Kübler / Tages-Anzeiger, Zurich

»[With his language] Hartmann succeeds in striking a soft chord, and he also manages to describe the horror [of war camps].«

 

Christian Berzins / Tages-Anzeiger, Zurich

»A masterful balancing act.«

Elmar Krekeler / Die Welt, Berlin

»The Swiss author, who repeatedly shows in his novels that the present cannot exist without the past, lambastes his homeland for self-righteously extolling itself as a bastion of democracy throughout history.«

Lilo Solcher / Augsburger Allgemeine

»[. . .] the book’s real strength lies in its unspoken topicality, this recurring conflict between humanity and a rationally comprehensible yet often cruel political pragmatism.«

Jutta Duhm-Heitzmann / WDR 3, Cologne

»Through these characters, Hartmann asks questions of history, of the Switzerland from that time, and of his readers too. He doesn’t answer them. And that’s exactly as it should be.«

Susanne Kübler / Tages-Anzeiger, Zurich
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